Remember to check your Facebook Profiles

Remember to check your Facebook Profiles

We love Facebook; it has become a social hub for family, friends and even businesses. ¼ of Facebook users check Facebook more than 5 times a day. Admittedly we all have an addiction and we spend a lot of time looking through our newsfeed, but what about our profile?

We expect that the notifications will share with us what other people have done as an action on the content we share, whether it is a like, share, comment or if someone else is sharing something with us. However, we do miss some actions, our newsfeeds will not always inform us nor will our notifications and that means that some actions are not getting responses.

If you were to check your profile today, most likely you will see some missed actions that your community has done and may feel ignored due to a lack of your response. Facebook has made ways for us to stay informed but that doesn’t mean we won’t miss something while we are away, offline or if the newsfeed is full of updates.

So remember to check-in with your profile to ensure that everyone who has taken the time to engage with you is getting the deserved attention back, it is after all a relationship of connections we build on Facebook and in order for people to want to remain connected there must always be a give and take.

Social Group Icons” image via Shutterstock

Written by Scarlett Madison

+Scarlett Madison is a mom and a friend. She blogs for a living at Social News Watch but really prefers to read more than write. Find her on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest.
SEE MORE ARTICLES BY "Scarlett Madison"

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5 Comments »

 
#1
Beth Shook
November 9th, 2012 at 4:10 pm

Is this a real problem? I find it hard to believe that loved ones are agonizing over my delayed response to a wall post.

Readers would benefit more from Zadie Smith’s thoughtful review of “The Social Network,” in which she points out that on Facebook, “Connection is the goal. The quality of that connection, the quality of the information that passes through it, the quality of the relationship that connection permits—none of this is important. A lot of social networking software explicitly encourages people to make weak, superficial connections with each other … this might not be an entirely positive thing.” (http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2010/nov/25/generation-why/)

 
 
#2
Beth Shook
November 9th, 2012 at 4:10 pm

Is this a real problem? I find it hard to believe that loved ones are agonizing over my delayed response to a wall post.

Readers would benefit more from Zadie Smith’s thoughtful review of “The Social Network,” in which she points out that on Facebook, “Connection is the goal. The quality of that connection, the quality of the information that passes through it, the quality of the relationship that connection permits—none of this is important. A lot of social networking software explicitly encourages people to make weak, superficial connections with each other … this might not be an entirely positive thing.” (http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2010/nov/25/generation-why/)

 
 
#3
Beth Shook
November 9th, 2012 at 4:10 pm

Is this a real problem? I find it hard to believe that loved ones are agonizing over my delayed response to a wall post.

Readers would benefit more from Zadie Smith’s thoughtful review of “The Social Network,” in which she points out that on Facebook, “Connection is the goal. The quality of that connection, the quality of the information that passes through it, the quality of the relationship that connection permits—none of this is important. A lot of social networking software explicitly encourages people to make weak, superficial connections with each other … this might not be an entirely positive thing.” (http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2010/nov/25/generation-why/)

 
 
#4
Beth Shook
November 9th, 2012 at 4:10 pm

Is this a real problem? I find it hard to believe that loved ones are agonizing over my delayed response to a wall post.

Readers would benefit more from Zadie Smith’s thoughtful review of “The Social Network,” in which she points out that on Facebook, “Connection is the goal. The quality of that connection, the quality of the information that passes through it, the quality of the relationship that connection permits—none of this is important. A lot of social networking software explicitly encourages people to make weak, superficial connections with each other … this might not be an entirely positive thing.” (http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2010/nov/25/generation-why/)

 
 
#5
Beth Shook
November 9th, 2012 at 4:10 pm

Is this a real problem? I find it hard to believe that loved ones are agonizing over my delayed response to a wall post.

Readers would benefit more from Zadie Smith’s thoughtful review of “The Social Network,” in which she points out that on Facebook, “Connection is the goal. The quality of that connection, the quality of the information that passes through it, the quality of the relationship that connection permits—none of this is important. A lot of social networking software explicitly encourages people to make weak, superficial connections with each other … this might not be an entirely positive thing.” (http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2010/nov/25/generation-why/)

 

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