If you see a drone flying over NYC, call the FBI

Drone Overhead

The image above is not one of the drone that was spotted by a pilot flying into New York City, but it may appear something like this. Then again, it may not be the drone you’re looking for if you’re the FBI.

The one they want was spotted by an Alitalia airlines pilot on final approach to John F. Kennedy Airport on Monday afternoon. It was small, only about three feet wide, and had four propellers. If you think that it was probably just an RC plane or something, keep in mind that it was seen at approximately 1,750 feet. Here’s the FBI’s release:

On Monday, March, 4, 2013, at approximately 1:15 p.m., the pilot of Alitalia Flight #608 spotted a small, unmanned aircraft while on approach to John F. Kennedy International Airport. The Alitalia flight was roughly three miles from runway 31R when the incident occurred at an altitude of approximately 1,750 feet. The unmanned aircraft came within 200 feet of the Alitalia plane.

The FBI is investigating the incident and looking to identify and locate the aircraft and its operator. The unnamed aircraft was described as black in color and no more than three feet wide with four propellers.

“The FBI is asking anyone with information about the unmanned aircraft or the operator to contact us,” said Special Agent in Charge John Giacalone. “Our paramount concern is the safety of aircraft passengers and crew.”

Anyone with information is asked to call the FBI at 212-384-1000. Tipsters may remain anonymous.

If this is a new thing in surveillance, we might all be in trouble. To anyone on the ground, it would appear to be a bird if it was seen at all. The fact that it was first spotted by a pilot is at least a little alarming. We’re already following the story of the Predator B drones being used in domestic surveillance.

Written by Connor Livingston

+Connor Livingston is a tech blogger who will be launching his own site soon, Lythyum. He lives in Oceanside, California, and has never surfed in his life. Find him on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest.
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