A Berlin artist has created his own Google Glass Wi-Fi jammer

While there are some who wholeheartedly embrace Google Glass, there are those whocompletely shun it. In fact we have heard reports of violence against those who wear Google Glass, even when that violence is uncalled for. So what’s a better way of ensuring that everyone gets their wish? Well how about a Google Glass jammer? Berlin artist Julian Oliver has written a simple program which he is calling Glasshole.sh. What his program does is that it is able to detect when a Google Glass device is attempting to connect to a WiFi network, which is supposedly based on a unique character string found in the MAC addresses of the Glass headset.

Not a fan of Google Glass’s ability to turn ordinary humans into invisibly recording surveillance cyborgs? Now you can create your own “glasshole-free zone.” Berlin artist Julian Oliver has written a simple program called Glasshole.sh that detects any Glass device attempting to connect to a Wi-Fi network based on a unique character string that he says he’s found in the MAC addresses of Google’s augmented reality headsets. Install Oliver’s program on a Raspberry Pi or Beaglebone mini-computer and plug it into a USB network antenna, and the gadget becomes a Google Glass detector, sniffing the local network for signs of Glass users. When it detects Glass, it uses the program Aircrack-NG to impersonate the network and send a “deauthorization” command, cutting the headset’s Wi-Fi connection. It can also emit a beep to signal the Glass-wearer’s presence to anyone nearby. “To say ‘I don’t want to be filmed’ at a restaurant, at a party, or playing with your kids is perfectly OK. But how do you do that when you don’t even know if a device is recording?” Oliver tells WIRED. “This steps up the game. It’s taking a jammer-like approach.”

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