Can Anyone Save Delicious? Only If Yahoo Lets Them.

With Delicious in purgatory, can anything bring the trend-setting social bookmarking site back to (even half of) its former glory, pre-Yahoo? Some are showing interest in buying it. Sources say Yahoo is going to get around to considering how to unload it in January. In the meantime, it’s just sort of… there.

News that it was on the chopping block really put a dent in the site’s ability to stay relevant. Users have scrambled looking for a new place to store their bookmarks. Former employees are speaking out. The founder is willing to “help” but not willing to buy it back. What do they need to do to stay alive?

It’s not up to them. Yahoo itself must do whatever it takes to keep the site alive, and if that means taking much less than the $15 million offer they passed on last year, so be it. Investors are looking at it as a sub-$5 million purchase, which isn’t enough to scratch an itch amongst Yahoo’s other financial pains.

And yet, they must.

Yahoo can actually turn this around. They can make it a good thing. They can do it right and make sure that Delicious transitions over to new owners smoothly as well as help to promote its health and help to nurse it back into shape. They can take their losses now and make gains as a result later.

How? This can turn into a major debacle bigger than they anticipate if Delicious dies. Companies with passionate founders may start shying away from considering Yahoo as a suitor if they build a (bigger) reputation as a “killer of once-great things.” But, by building up Yahoo and turning the situation into “putting the company into a better situation with the right fit” even at some financial loss on their end, they could save some face.

Oh, and they would also be helping to save one of the first powerful social media sites that was doing great until they decided to touch them with their wicked, sickly hands.

 

Kevin Rose Should Step Up and Step In

While most would question the direction that Rose’s original startup, Digg, has taken in the last year, few would question his visionary’s ability to take a concept and make it great. Pownce and WeFollow were both promising with excellent concepts. Pownce fell to the Twitter machine (which even Rose admitted he used more) and WeFollow demonstrated relative success.

What Rose could do with Delicious is the most intriguing case out there ¬†for the survival of the site. It’s small enough that he could probably be the major money behind it, leaving creative and directional control of the site in his hands (some speculated that he was moved in certain directions with Digg based upon investor intervention). What would that mean for the site?

Written by Rocco Penn

A tech blogger, social media analyst, and general promoter of all things positive in the world. "Bring it. I'm ready." Find me on Media Caffeine, Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.
SEE MORE ARTICLES BY "Rocco Penn"

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15 Comments »

 
#1
PengTeets
January 1st, 2011 at 1:45 pm

Noep, I dont think so. I think its just too late.

http://www.anon-web-tools.edu.tc

 
 
#2
John Adam
January 1st, 2011 at 2:04 pm

Kevin Rose should DEFINITELY buy Delicious. He may have participated in the downfall of Digg, but what he did initially was amazing and the guy’s a genius.

 
 
#3
Lakawak
January 1st, 2011 at 8:37 pm

Yet Digg was never profitable.

 
 
#4
Superprince
January 1st, 2011 at 2:48 pm

What I really wanted to see was Yahoo powered by Delicious, not Delicious powered by Yahoo. The search results with the right filters could have been very strong based upon real-time integration with bookmarks.

 
 
#5
Seth
January 1st, 2011 at 3:08 pm

Keven Rose should keep his distance. He was as responsible for the success and failure of Digg as anyone there. Pownce was just a ripoff idea. And WeFollow is not an original site, but rather a by product of Twitter.

But on the subject at hand: Delicious needs someone to save it. And Yahoo! can help control the damage between now and then.

 
 
#6
DWSMALL
January 1st, 2011 at 3:28 pm

The problem with delicious is that it’s main group of users relate to a culture that YAHOO can not relate to. Lets be honest, most people that use YAHOO have never heard of delicious.

 
 
#7
you're weak
January 1st, 2011 at 6:22 pm

weak…

 
 
#8
awahid
January 2nd, 2011 at 3:59 am

Can’t believe Delicious is on sale…

 
 
#9
hiu
January 2nd, 2011 at 9:31 pm

I am so confused

 
 
#10
Jarik
January 2nd, 2011 at 9:44 pm

f**k Yahoo. They screwed up a bunch of good things.

 
 
#11
Kevin
January 2nd, 2011 at 9:45 pm

Great post guys loved it.

 
 
#12
Terex
January 2nd, 2011 at 9:46 pm

This is what i was looking for.

 
 
#13
Tranis
January 2nd, 2011 at 9:47 pm

My theory is that if there are still people visiting delicious, they might use Digg as the alternative if the two combine.
Subtopics could be brought back in the form of tags.
Digg is basically a news site with bookmarks anyway.

 
 
#14
MrGroove
January 3rd, 2011 at 11:10 am

Ding dong Delicious is dead… Even if Yahoo! keeps it around for a few more years the development of the service has stopped and we all know what happens when a company puts a product on the shelf.

My advice, Evernote. Done and Done… Evernote replaces Delicious with its free version and oh so much more.

 

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