VoIP vs. landlines: the showdown

Most advances in technology are synonymous with increased costs and unclear effects on liability exposure.  However, that is not necessarily the case when it comes to home phone service.  Many of you may be paying for a traditional landline phone service that is actually costing you a lot more than the more cutting-edge option:  VoIP digital phone service.

Voice-Over Internet Protocol, or “VoIP” phone service, is exactly what it sounds like:  using your internet to make phone calls.  For the most basic VoIP service, you will pay under ten dollars every month!  This super-low rate includes local and long-distance phone calls.  If you make quite a few international phone calls, there are VoIP packages for you, too, and these are much, much less expensive than the international packages offered by traditional phone companies.

Services like voicemail, call waiting and forwarding, and caller ID come at no extra charge with your digital phone service; these same sorts of services will often entail an extra thirty dollars with a traditional phone company. This is good for consumers, but it’s also a huge boon to scrappy small business owners that need to stretch every dollar.

The VoIP works through a small “soft phone” that hooks onto your computer.  This device is about the size of a small cellular telephone.  It is easy to hook up, and easy to move.  Basically, you could think of this VoIP service as a pretty inexpensive cell phone.  The software is pretty tiny, and hooks up easily to your computer.  You can take it with you wherever you go, and hook it up to your laptop.  You will have the same free long-distance and international calling plan wherever you have internet service.

At such a reasonable rate, digital phone service represents one wave of the future that you cannot let wash right over you.  Change from your traditional landline to a VoIP digital phone today, and start enjoying great service at a great price today.

Written by Drew Hendricks

Drew Hendricks is an SEO and Social Media specialist living in Seattle, Washington. Drew writes words that people enjoy reading every moment they are awake.
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2 Comments »

 
#1
sysadminwatdo
May 8th, 2012 at 8:02 pm

Must I point out to you that a softphone is not a separate device, but a software application?  Do you truly not realize that a Vonage adapter into which you plug an analog phone is NOT a softphone?  I’m disappointed

 
 
#2
Michael
May 8th, 2012 at 10:28 pm

Why are you showing an image of google voice here? GV is not VOIP.

 

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