The next Android update could be coming to the Galaxy S5 first

Samsung isn’t exactly known for releasing fast Android updates to its handsets and tablets, including flagship devices, but it looks like the company is already testing the latest Android version on its latest flagship handset. According to SamMobile, Samsung is working with an Android 4.4.3 KitKat build on the Galaxy S5, although it’s not clear when the company will actually release it. Apparently, Samsung is integrating its own software with Android 4.4.3 and could release the update a month after Nexus devices get it. Google has been rumored for a while to be working on a KitKat 4.4.3 update, although nothing has materialized yet and until Google releases the new update, Samsung won’t update the Galaxy S5 either.

Android 4.4 KitKat might have rolled out to quite a few Samsung devices already, but the update is yet to start making its way to most of the low-end and mid-range phones in the company’s lineup. We’ve heard that Samsung has been working on those updates and is also planning on bringing Android 4.4.3 to some of its devices, and thanks to our insider, we’ve obtained info on where the company stands regarding said updates. Starting off with Android 4.4.3 (build number KTU70), the yet-to-be announced version of Android is currently being tested on the Galaxy S5 (both the Exynos and Snapdragon models) and the LTE-A variant of the Galaxy S4 (GT-I9506A). However, Android 4.4.3 is only being integrated with Samsung’s own software and features at the moment, so it will likely not be made available for a month or so (Google will probably roll it out by the end of this month or sometime in June before Google I/O, after which we can expect to see it rolling out to the Galaxy S5 and other devices.) It’s also a bit strange that 4.4.3 is currently being integrated into the Galaxy S4 LTE-A – from what we know, Android 4.4.2 is actually being tested on that device, but since it hasn’t rolled out yet, we might see the handset skipping directly to 4.4.3 in the future.

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